This Remote-Controlled A-10 Lets You Unleash Hell On Enemies

Gear
A YouTube video showing a remote-controlled A-10 WartHog firing a nerf cannon.

For those who have ever dreamed of calling in a gun run on backyard intruders — squirrels, racoons, neighborhood kids — there’s a new tool for your arsenal. A recent YouTube video shows a remote-controlled A-10 Warthog that someone custom-made in their garage, doing gun runs over a golf course. The tiny tank killer even has a cannon modelled after the real A-10’s 600-pound GAU-8.


This one is built around Nerf’s Rival Zeus blaster, which fires 12 foam balls in under a second from the nose of the A-10. It even sounds a bit like the real thing. Check out how it was made in the below video and watch it strafe some cardboard tanks.

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