A Russian Jet Came Within 20 Feet Of A US Surveillance Plane Over The Black Sea

news
Photo via Wikimedia Commons

On Tuesday, a Russian Su-27 fighter jet aggressively buzzed a P-8 Poseidon surveillance plane deployed by the U.S. Navy  over the Black Sea, Navy Times reports. The two aircraft flew in tandem just 20 feet apart for five minutes, one of the closer brushes between U.S. and Russian aircraft amid increasingly more frequent encounters in recent weeks


NBC News reported that the Su-27 approached the P-8A when it was “conducting routine operations in international airspace,” said Capt. Pamela Kunze, a spokeswoman for U.S. Naval Forces Europe.

Kunze said that the interaction was deemed cordial, though the Su-27’s proximity the U.S. aircraft was atypically close.

Russian officials suggested that the Su-27 was deployed to intercept the Poseidon  when radars detected the American aircraft over neutral waters heading toward the Russian border.

“After approaching a plane at a safe distance the Russian pilot visually identified the flying object as a U.S, surveillance plane,” the Russian military reported on RT.

Though Kunze said 20 feet is exceptionally close, she added that U.S. aircraft and ships frequently interact with Russian military vehicles.

The commander who deployed the P-8 considered the encounter to be friendly, despite other interactions being considered dangerous from much greater distances.

In February,  a Russian patrol plane flew low and close to the USS Porter, followed by three Russian fighter jets. Just a month later, a Russian spy ship was seen off the coast of Georgia. And in late April, U.S. aircraft intercepted two Russian TU-95 Bear bombers off coast of Alaska.

Dustin A. Peters (Cape May County Sheriff's Office)

A former Marine arrested as he tried to enter the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center in Cape May with a modified AK-47 rifle, handgun, body armor and ammunition faces federal weapons charges, officials said Friday.

Read More
The United Launch Alliance's Delta IV rocket launches with a Wideband Global SATCOM WGS-10 satellite from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., Complex 37 on March 15, 2019. The satellite brings enhanced communication capability for command and control of U.S. military forces on the battlefield. (U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Andrew Satran)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The US military's newest service, the Space Force, is only about a month old, having been signed into law by President Donald Trump on December 20.

Read More
(Cecil Field POW/MIA Memorial, Inc./Facebook)

Military veterans from throughout Northeast Florida came together Saturday morning to honor comrades in arms who were prisoners of war or missing in action, and remember their sacrifice.

Read More
The remains of Army Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin arrived back to Fort Bragg a week after he was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan. (U.S. Army)

After the plane landed, Pope Army Airfield was silent on Saturday.

A chaplain prayed and a family member sobbed.

Tarah McLaughlin's fingers traced her husband's flag-draped coffin before she pressed two fingers to her lips then pressed her fingers to the coffin.

The remains of Staff Sgt. Ian McLaughlin, 29, of Newport News, Virginia, arrived back to Fort Bragg a week after he was killed Jan. 11 by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.

Pfc. Miguel Angel Villalon, 21, of Joliet, Illinois, also was killed in the same incident.

Read More

The Space Force has a name tape now

popular

The U.S. Space Force has a name tape for uniforms now. Get excited people.

In a tweet from its official account, the Space Force said its uniform name tapes have "touched down in the Pentagon," sharing a photo of it on the chest of Gen. John W. Raymond, the newly-minted Chief of Space Operations for the new service branch nested in the Department of the Air Force.

Read More