Sailor Gives Birth To Unexpected Baby While Fighting ISIS

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On Sunday, Sept. 11, the USS Eisenhower, which is tasked with fighting ISIS, became host to an unlikely stowaway — a newborn baby.


The night before, a third class petty officer from Carrier Air Wing 3 checked into the carrier's medical clinic, complaining of stomach pains. Nine hours later, she gave birth to a healthy 7-pound baby girl, according to a memo obtained by Navy Times.

Her command, whose mission was to fly over Iraq and Syria in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, did not know. And the sailor, whose name has not been released, said she was also unaware that she was pregnant.

The phenomenon of unknown pregnancy is not unheard of. According to pregnancy author Jen Pincott, one in 450 pregnant women don't even know they're pregnant until they're 20 weeks along. And one in 2,500 women don't know they're pregnant until they're in labor — as was the case for this sailor.

Under normal circumstances, pregnant service members leave an operational command at 20 weeks and certainly don’t deploy.

Despite the surprise, “Both the mother and the baby are healthy and are doing well,” 5th Fleet spokesman Cmdr. Bill Urban said. “The family practitioner aboard Ike, who delivered the baby, is certified in child birth and has experience delivering babies.”

After just a few hours, the mother and child were airlifted to a local hospital in Bahrain.

There’s just one lingering question: what do you name a baby born on an aircraft carrier, on 9/11, while her mother was fighting ISIS?

Leave us your idea in the comments.

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

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