British Conspiracy Theorists Are Convinced This Air Force Base Is US Mind Control HQ

news
Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado
U.S. Air Force

Schriever Air Force Base on the plains east of Colorado Springs has always been a place of mystery.


Home to the 50th Space Wing, which controls satellites including the Global Positioning System, Schriever has been dubbed "Area 52" and "The Place the Air Force Goes When it Wants to be Alone."

But according to a fringe group headquartered in the United Kingdom, Schriever has another distinction: It's home to a space-based satellite electronic mind-control and torture system run by the United States.

Calling itself "hackthetorture.com" the group went on a Twitter offensive over the weekend to sell its conspiracy theory.

"If it's not U.S. Space Command in charge of the 1,400 satellites Tom, who is?" the man who runs the site said in a Twitter message. "Where is the lawful authority for such 1,400 satellites Tom, who authorized their deployment, who funded them, who controls them? Burning urgent questions 4 the 1 percent of the planet they currently torture."

The group says it's loosely affiliated with QAnon, a right-wing American group that at its core says a vast conspiracy is targeting President Donald Trump.

The UK group also claims the U.S. government covered up the truth behind the 9/11 attacks.

It also says the Air Force has hundreds of satellites that can read minds and torture people from orbit.

There are a few problems with the group's satellite theory. First is the fact that mind-control technology hasn't been invented, unless you count the effect Instagram has on teenage girls. Second: The U.S. doesn't have nearly that many satellites, with just 282 launches of all kinds for the military and intelligence agencies since 1984. Third: Schriever, for all its secrecy is actually pretty boring.

The first two issues are settled fact, so I'll focus on the third.

Behind the prison-like double fence at Schriever are a few hundred airmen who fly satellites for a living. They control an array of communications and navigation birds, and probably a few of them control intelligence-gathering satellites.

The navigation satellites send out a radio signal that gives a constant update of the time — imagine looking at your watch every few seconds and announcing your findings to a crowd. It's important, but not something you'd write a novel about.

The communications satellites are basically cell phone towers in the sky.

The intelligence satellites, the very existence of which remains classified, are also not that exciting. They're pretty much copies of the Hubble Space Telescope that look down instead of up.

So, what proof exists that the U.S. doesn't have secret mind control technology? The examples are fairly easy to find. If the U.S. had more than 1,000 spacecraft equipped to change minds, I doubt the Taliban would still be targeting our troops. We'd probably also be selling a lot more Fords and Chevrolets in Japan, too.

If electronic mind control were possible and owned by the United States, we would have won the recent World Cup in soccer, President Trump would probably get fewer headlines and his complaint of "fake news" could be dealt with just a few signals from orbit.

Probably the only effective and globally-available mind-control device from the United States is a brownish liquid distilled in Kentucky.

None of the facts, though, seem likely to change the minds of those behind hackthetoture.com.

"It's a holocaust," the said on Twitter.

———

©2018 The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colo.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

USCGC Bramble (Public domain)

A 76- year-old former U.S. Coast Guard ship that was one of the first vessels to pass through the indomitable Northwest Passage and circumnavigate the entire North American continent, will be auctioned off on the steps of the U.S. District Courthouse in Mobile at Noon on Dec. 4.

Read More Show Less

It can see through smoke and in near total darkness, translate written foreign languages and pull up detailed maps, and can rapidly acquire and identify targets. It's the Army's new heads-up display of the future, and it's coming to an armory near you sooner than you think.

Read More Show Less

Care packages put together by First Lady Melania Trump and Second Lady Karen Pence on Wednesday could soon end up at a military base near you.

Read More Show Less

A Coast Guard seaman accused of murder was released from a San Diego brig Monday as the admiral overseeing his prosecution ordered a new hearing in the case.

Seaman Ethan W. Tucker, 21, was arrested August 28 after a seven-month Coast Guard investigation into the January death of Seaman Ethan Kelch, 19, who served on the same ship as Tucker— the Douglas Munro, a high endurance cutter based in Kodiak, Alaska.

Tucker is charged with murder, involuntary manslaughter, aggravated assault, making false official statements, obstruction of justice and failure to obey orders. He has not entered a plea and won't do so unless his case is referred to a court-martial.

Read More Show Less
Oops (Twitter)

There's something very, very wrong with a recent tweet from the official Twitter account of the Defense Department. Can you spot it?

Let's zoom in, just in case.

Read More Show Less