Science Says Having Sex Makes You Better At Your Job

Health & Fitness
Screenshot via YouTube

Does work have you down? Bang it out.


As if you needed another reason to pester your significant other to get down and dirty, new research suggests that frequent sexual activity can make you better at your job. This arousing study, conducted by researchers at  Oregon State Universityfound that people who bang on the reg feel more fulfilled in their professional lives.

“We make jokes about people having a 'spring in their step,' but it turns out this is actually a real thing and we should pay attention to it,” wrote Keith Leavitt, an associate professor in OSU's College of Business. "Maintaining a healthy relationship that includes a healthy sex life will help employees stay happy and engaged in their work, which benefits the employees and the organizations they work for."

The researchers worked to compare the sex lives and work environments of employees in frisky relationships to those in sad, sexless relationships, and discovered that those who had turned the heat up in their bedroom at night were more productive the next day at work.

Overall, they surveyed 159 married employees for course of two weeks and found that employees who had sex were in a good moods the following day. That, in turn, led to better work engagement and job satisfaction throughout the workday.

“Sexual intercourse triggers the release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with the reward centers in the brain, as well as oxytocin, a neuropeptide associated with social bonding and attachment,” Leavitt said. “That makes sex a natural and relatively automatic mood elevator and the benefits extend well into the next day.”

He added, “This is a reminder that sex has social, emotional, and physiological benefits, and it's important to make it a priority.”

Do it for work, and if that doesn’t spark your lover’s interest, tell him or her that it’s for the economy.

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