Meet Sergeant Stubby, The Most 'Decorated' Dog Of World War I

The Long March

Stubby was a stray bull terrier adopted in 1917 by a soldier, Robert Conroy, during the latter’s training with the U.S. 26th “Yankee” Division on the grounds of Yale University.  Smuggled by Conroy onto a troopship bound for France, Stubby is said to have participated in four campaigns and 17 battles.  He has been called the most decorated war dog of World War I and was even presented with a gold medal from the Humane Education Society by Pershing in 1921.


The charismatic canine is the subject of a new animated movie, “Sgt. Stubby.” I saw it with my two youngest children and it is surprising good – sincere and sentimental, but not maudlin, well-paced, with an adequate amount of technical detail (despite the occasional mistake).  The movie does an admirable job of threading the needle of being pro-military without being jingoistic and is arguably the most positive portrayal of the World War I era of the last 75 years. It packs a lot of history into its fairly brief run time, incorporating doughboy interactions with French poilus and civilians, the Spanish Flu epidemic, fear of gas, the service of naturalized Germans in the AEF, and the fighting that took place right up to the morning of the armistice.  It is both kid- and adult-friendly, and I hope it finds an audience.

John Throckmorton is a business executive who lives with his family north of Atlanta.  He served for 20 years as an infantry officer with assignments at Fort Bragg, Fort Hood, Fort Benning, and in Iraq.  His great-grandfather was a machine gun officer with the U.S. 35th Infantry Division (and ironically saw the start of the next war while serving a senior staff officer with the U.S. Army’s Hawaiian Department on December 7th, 1941).  His World War I reading list can be found here:  https://taskandpurpose.com/american-expeditionary-force-books/

Sam Fellman
(Courtesy of Jackie Melendrez)

Editor's Note: The following story highlights a veteran at Iron Mountain. Committed to including talented members of the military community in its workplace, Iron Mountain is a client of Hirepurpose, a Task & Purpose sister company. Learn more here.

Jackie Melendrez couldn't be prouder of her husband, her sons, and the fact that she works for the trucking company Iron Mountain. This regional router has been a Mountaineer since 2017, and says the support she receives as a military spouse and mother is unparalleled.

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Photo: U.S. Army

Master Sgt. Larry Hawks, a retired engineer sergeant who served with 3rd Special Forces Group, is being awarded the Distinguished Service Cross on Friday for "valorous actions" in Afghanistan in 2005.

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(Reuters/Lawrence Hurley)

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The justices were divided on many of the legal issues but the vote was 7-2 to overturn a lower court ruling that had declared the so-called Peace Cross in Bladensburg unconstitutional in a legal challenge mounted by the American Humanist Association, a group that advocates for secular governance. The concrete cross was erected in 1925 as a memorial to troops killed in World War One.

The ruling made it clear that a long-standing monument in the shape of a Christian cross on public land was permissible but the justices were divided over whether other types of religious displays and symbols on government property would be allowed. Those issues are likely to come before the court in future cases.

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(Associated Press/Facebook)

A relative of the man who opened fire outside downtown Dallas' federal building this week warned the FBI in 2016 that he shouldn't be allowed to buy a gun because he was depressed and suicidal, his mother said Thursday.

Brian Clyde's half-brother called the FBI about his concerns, their mother Nubia Brede Solis said. Clyde was in the Army at the time.

On Monday, Clyde opened fire with an AR-15-style rifle at the Earle Cabell Federal Building. He was fatally shot by federal law enforcement. No one else was seriously injured. His family believes Clyde wanted to be killed.

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