Single Sailors Say Serving In The Navy Hurts Their Chances Of Getting Married

Family & Relationships
Senior Chief Electrician's Mate Nuclear Travis Radzyminski receives the ceremonial “First Kiss” and a hug from wife Crystal during a homecoming ceremony on the pier for Los-Angeles class fast attack submarine USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723), June 29, 2018.
U.S. Navy/Culinary Specialist Seaman Jonathan Perez

Love is hard to find. It's even harder if you're in the Navy.


At least, that's what single sailors told Navy officials in a new survey on personal and professional choices released Wednesday.

The Navy says that 52 percent of unmarried women and 45 percent of unmarried men surveyed said being in the Navy has decreased the likelihood they will get married.

The survey did not delve into details about why sailors feel the Navy makes them less likely to wed, but the challenges of developing and sustaining relationships during lengthy deployments and over the course of frequent moves around the globe are well known.

"Results indicate that Navy careers negatively impact the personal lives of men and women," an executive summary of the survey's findings says.

The Navy is interested in these details and others about family life because it matters to sailors and the Navy wants to retain talented personnel. It also says these issues can impact readiness.

The survey also showed that women in the Navy are less likely to be married than men, 56 percent compared with 77 percent, respectively. But female sailors who are married are more likely to be married or in a long-term partnership to someone else in the military than men, 42 percent compared with 6 percent, respectively.

Of those relationships where both serve in the military, 56 percent of sailors said they're satisfied with their ability to co-locate in the same region as their spouse, while 21 percent were dissatisfied, the Navy said.

Meanwhile, 60 percent of married sailors said their Navy career has negatively impacted their spouses' employment opportunities. Many states are working to ease licensing requirements for military spouses in professions like teaching so they can have an easier time finding work after being transferred.

Sen. Tim Kaine also has introduced legislation aimed at improving the job chances of military spouses that includes changing federal hiring procedures to expedite hiring of spouses on or near military installations and encouraging private defense contractors to focus more on hiring military spouses. The legislation also aims to improve access to child care and asks the Defense Department to study how to expand the awareness of career training programs for spouses of service members.

The survey received responses from 8,040 men and 4,642 women and has a margin of error of 1 percent, according to the Navy.

———

©2018 The Virginian-Pilot (Norfolk, Va.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

WATCH NEXT:

Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

The admiral in charge of Navy special operators will decide whether to revoke the tridents for Eddie Gallagher and other SEALs involved in the Navy's failed attempt to prosecute Gallagher for murder, a defense official said Tuesday.

The New York Times' David Philipps first reported on Tuesday that the Navy could revoke the SEAL tridents for Gallagher as well as his former platoon commander Lt. Jacob Portier and two other SEALs: Lt. Cmdr. Robert Breisch and Lt. Thomas MacNeil.

The four SEALs will soon receive a letter that they have to appear before a board that will consider whether their tridents should be revoked, a defense official told Task & Purpose on condition of anonymity.

Read More Show Less

Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman made sure to take the time to correct a Congressman on Tuesday while testifying before Congress, requesting that he be addressed by his officer rank and not "Mr."

Read More Show Less
From left to right: Naval Special Warfare Operator First Class Eddie Gallagher, Army 1Lt. Clint Lorance, and Army Special Forces Maj. Mathew Golsteyn

On Friday, President Donald Trump intervened in the cases of three U.S. service members accused of war crimes, granting pardons to two Army soldiers accused of murder in Afghanistan and restoring the rank of a Navy SEAL found guilty of wrongdoing in Iraq.

While the statements coming out of the Pentagon regarding Trump's actions have been understandably measured, comments from former military leaders and other knowledgable veterans help paint a picture as to why the president's Friday actions are so controversial.

Read More Show Less

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. aircraft carrier strike group Abraham Lincoln sailed through the vital Strait of Hormuz on Tuesday, U.S. officials told Reuters, amid simmering tensions between Iran and the United States.

Tensions in the Gulf have risen since attacks on oil tankers this summer, including off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, and a major assault on energy facilities in Saudi Arabia. Washington has blamed Iran, which has denied being behind the attacks on global energy infrastructure.

Read More Show Less

Iran continues to support the Taliban to counter U.S. influence in Afghanistan, a recent Defense Intelligence Agency report on Iran's military power says.

Iran's other goals in Afghanistan include combating ISIS-Khorasan and increasing its influence in any government that is formed as part of a political reconciliation of the warring sides, according to the report, which the Pentagon released on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less