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Sgt. Zachary K. Tokomoto, an assistant convoy commander with Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, ground guides a vehicle into the motor transportation lot at Forward Operating Base Geronimo, Afghanistan, Oct. 7, 2010.
Sgt. Zachary K. Tokomoto, an assistant convoy commander with Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, ground guides a vehicle into the motor transportation lot at Forward Operating Base Geronimo, Afghanistan, Oct. 7, 2010.
Photo by Sgt. Mark Fayloga

An Assessment Of American Military Power Isn’t Realistic Unless It Compares Our Strength To Others

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On Feb. 24, the Heritage Foundation, a D.C.-based conservative think tank, published an index of American military strengths. The assessment, which has been criticized by some for shortsightedness, graded all of the military services, as well as America’s nuclear capabilities, on whether or not they were “marginally capable” of waging two regional conflicts at the same time. It seems that the American military has a new benchmark — marginal capability.

However, there’s one problem. The section, “Assessing Threats To U.S. Vital Interests,” makes no mention of U.S. military strength relative to other countries.

“The lack of a solid analysis of relative military power makes the overall well-researched report less compelling, and appears to be a prime example of inside-the-beltway introversion, with the authors more consumed with battling the overblown Pentagon bureaucracy, than with what is happening in the rest of the world,” writes Franz-Stefan Gady in his counterpoint, “How Powerful Is the US Military?”

Get the full story at The Diplomat.