MORE HARM THAN GOOD
A U.S. Army UH-72A Lakota MEDEVAC helicopter assigned to the Air Ambulance Detachment, 5th Aviation Battalion, Operations Group for Joint Readiness Training Center, Fort Polk, La. waits on the ground Aug. 18, 2013 at the Geronimo Drop Zone.
A U.S. Army UH-72A Lakota MEDEVAC helicopter assigned to the Air Ambulance Detachment, 5th Aviation Battalion, Operations Group for Joint Readiness Training Center, Fort Polk, La. waits on the ground Aug. 18, 2013 at the Geronimo Drop Zone.
Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Parker Gyokeres

Study Finds Airlifting Casualties May Be Detrimental To Brain Injuries

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While transferring battle-injured service members to hospitals by way of air evacuation is the fastest way to get patients out of the field, a study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine recently found that this method may cause more damage to those patients suffering from traumatic brain injury.

The Air Force-funded study — performed on rats — proved the inflammation of the brain that typically occurs after a head injury was worsened by pressure changes, which typically occur in flight.

Alan Faden, the University of Maryland anesthesiology professor who led the study said, “What we found is that they were materially worse at the end.”

Get the full story at The Washington Post.