CLINICAL FAILURE
Support Soldiers from 3rd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), flown by 2nd General Support Aviation Battalion, 4th Aviation Regiment and led by a Special Forces Team, posture for a night air assault raid during training.
Support Soldiers from 3rd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), flown by 2nd General Support Aviation Battalion, 4th Aviation Regiment and led by a Special Forces Team, posture for a night air assault raid during training.
Photo By Sgt. Duke Tran

The Army’s Substance-Abuse Program May Be Doing More Harm Than Good

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A USA Today investigation, published on Wednesday, Mar. 11, indicates that the Army’s substance-abuse program might be in trouble — or, shambles, depending on whether or not you’re a glass half empty, or half full kind of person. According to the report, as many as half of the 7,000 soldiers turned away last year after being screened for drug or alcohol problems should have been treated, and half of the Army’s 54 substance-abuse clinics fall below professional standards.

There are also claims that the service hired incompetent or under qualified caregivers — like the unlicensed “counselor who gave a ‘good’ rating to a soldier who hanged himself two hours later, according to an internal Army report provided to USA today.”

Get the full story at USA Today.