TOO BIG TO FLY
DoD's first production F-35B Lightning II joint strike fighter flies toward its new home at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., escorted by Marine Corps F-18 Hornets.
DoD's first production F-35B Lightning II joint strike fighter flies toward its new home at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., escorted by Marine Corps F-18 Hornets.
Photo by Staff Sgt. Joely Santiago

The F-35 Is Under Fire Once Again

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A damning report published by National Security Network on Aug. 10 critiques the F-35 joint strike fighter, citing areas it desperately needs to excel in: maneuverability, stealth, and air-to-air combat.

“The F-35 will find itself outmaneuvered, outgunned, out of range, and visible to enemy sensors,” reads the report. “To avoid such a catastrophic outcome, Congress and DOD should begin the process of considering alternatives to a large-scale commitment to the F-35.”

This is not the first time the F-35 has received bad press. In fact, it’s the most recent on a laundry list of complaints that stretches back across two administrations to 2001. Since that time, Congress has repeatedly lobbied to keep the program over objections from the Pentagon and the Bush and Obama administrations.

Get the full story at Vocativ.