Is The US Headed For A Soft Civil War? A Political Scientist's Worries

The Long March
John L. Magee (c.1820 – c.1870)/Boston Athenaeum Digital Collections/Wikimedia Commons

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I think we're at the beginning of a soft civil war," political scientist Thomas Schaller told Bloomberg’s Francis Wilkinson.  "I don't know if the country gets out of it whole."

I know many of youse disagree. But I am struck that rational people continue to express such concerns. Why do you think this is so?

I don’t believe we’re to Kansas of the 1850s yet. But we seem to be lurching toward in that direction.

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