Warrant officer charged with stealing over $2 million of military gear from Fort Bragg

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A soldier formerly stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, was indicted on Tuesday for allegedly stealing a shit-ton of military gear.


Bryan Craig Allen, formerly a property book officer and chief warrant officer with the 4th Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group according to the Associated Press, allegedly stole over $2 million worth of equipment over two and a half years, including 43 enhanced night vision goggles, according to the indictment.

The 34-year-old was charged with theft of military property, conspiracy and aggravated identity theft.

The News & Observer reports that Defense Department police requires those goggles to now be destroyed. He sold them to a Fayetteville, North Carolina, military surplus store from December 2016 to July 2018, the AP reported, citing court documents.

If convicted, he could face up to 19 years behind bars and up to three years of supervised release. Per the AP, three other men were also charged, and others could still be charged down the line.

It's unclear if Allen and the others charged were preparing to use some of the stolen gear to storm Area 51.

(DoD photo)

Five people have been indicted in federal court in the Western District of Texas on charges of participating in a scheme to steal millions of dollars from benefits reserved for military members, U.S. Department of Justice officials said Wednesday.

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The warning, along with the policies issued recently by the Air Force, Coast Guard and Department of the Navy, comes as CBD is becoming increasingly ubiquitous across the country in many forms, from coffee additives and vaping liquids to tinctures, candies and other foods, carrying promises of health benefits ranging from pain and anxiety relief to sleeping aids and inflammation reduction.

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Two U.S. military service members were killed in Afghanistan on Wednesday, the Resolute Support mission announced in a press release.

Their identities are being withheld pending notification of next of kin, the command added.

A total of 16 U.S. troops have died in Afghanistan so far in 2019. Fourteen of those service members have died in combat including two service members killed in an apparent insider attack on July 29.

Two U.S. troops in Afghanistan have been killed in non-combat incidents and a sailor from the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln was declared dead after falling overboard while the ship was supporting operations in Afghanistan.

At least two defense contractors have also been killed in Afghanistan. One was a Navy veteran and the other had served in the Army.