In Praise of the Heroic Marine Who Gave Us Taco Bell

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I've always been drawn to stories about service members finding success after their time in the military is over. There's no shortage of inspiring stories to highlight.


Entrepreneurs, politicians, athletes, educators, and entertainers are all covered in the arena of successful veterans. But there are some whose stamp on our culture is almost unequaled.

Glen Bell is one of those veterans. After his time in the Marine Corps during World War II — he served as a steward in the general's mess through during the Guadalcanal campaign — he opened a string of successful burger and taco stands. After selling his shares, he founded Taco Bell in 1962, franchised it by 1964, and had 868 locations by the time he sold it to PepsiCo in 1978.

"You would think that serving food to generals in Guadalcanal wouldn't have much relevance later on," Bell said of his time in the Marines in his 1999 biography, Taco Titan: The Glen Bell Story. "But it taught me how to estimate how much food was needed based on the number of people served. That knowledge gave me confidence to start a restaurant."

He's the hero America needed, and his legacy should always be remembered as you're drunk and struggling to stay conscious at 3 a.m. as you shove a hastily assembled gordita down your gullet.

Bell passed away in 2010.

Are you fucking kidding me with this shit?

There's something very, very wrong with a recent tweet from the official Twitter account of the Defense Department. Can you spot it?

Let's zoom in, just in case.

The main takeaways from this whole incident:

1. That's clearly a Stryker, not a Paladin.

2. The use of #KnowYourMil in this tweet is the funniest self-inflicted wound of 2019.

3. We have no idea how the crew of this Stryker, clearly named 'Tazerface,' might feel about this flub, but we can venture a guess according to the vehicle's Guardians of the Galaxy namesake:

I love this job.

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The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, June 17, 2017 (U.S. Navy photo)

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Chief Master Sgt. Jason Morehouse. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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Roxanne Roellchen interacts with her sons in their family's new home, which they moved into after experiencing roaches, leaks and black mold at another property, at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas U.S. November 16, 2019. (Reuters/Callaghan O'Hare)

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At the time, Balfour Beatty Communities said it strove to correctly report its maintenance work. It blamed any problems on a sole former employee at the Oklahoma base.

Now, Reuters has found that Balfour Beatty employees systematically doctored records in a similar scheme at a Texas base.

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