U.S. Attorney General William Barr, flanked by Edward O'Callaghan, Acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General (L) and Deputy U.S. Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, speaks at a news conference to discuss Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential race, in Washington, U.S., April 18, 2019. (Reuters/Jonathan Ernst)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Attorney General William Barr on Thursday offered a spirited defense of President Donald Trump just before releasing Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russia's role in the 2016 U.S. election.

Barr, the top U.S. law enforcement official and a Trump appointee, revealed that the report detailed 10 episodes of potential obstruction of justice by the president.

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Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

Mitt Romney was not among the attendees at the first-ever PutinCon, a day-long symposium held in New York City on March 16, but his spirit hovered over the gathering. The former Republican candidate for president, briefly in the running to become Secretary of State under Donald Trump, famously declared in 2012 that the Russian Federation was America’s “No. 1 geopolitical foe.”

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AP Photo/Matt Rourke

President Donald Trump's campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, and Manafort's former business associate Rick Gates were indicted and told to surrender to federal authorities on Oct. 30.

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Photo via White House/Pete Souza/Wikimedia Commons

The National Security Agency infected key Russian networks with remotely-controlled "implants" that would cause "pain and discomfort" if they are ever used, according to a new report in The Washington Post.

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This is not an endorsement for any political candidate. Rather, this is a call to arms — to vote! — for all veterans and active military personnel. Your vote in the 2016 presidential election is more important than ever, because if we veterans voice ourselves in the full-throttled manner to which we are accustomed, our votes will be a deciding factor, regardless of which way it swings.

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Photo via Wikimedia Commons

This presidential election is one for the books. And although veterans have historically been strong advocates of voting as a civic duty, contentious nature of the 2016 election may change that. According to census data from the 2012 election, 71.2% of veterans are registered to vote. But this election, between Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, Republican candidate Donald Trump, has left many Americans questioning whether the electoral system is broken. Some veterans are voting for third-party candidates like Gary Johnson and Jill Stein, but others are choosing a different path: Abstention.

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