Retired two-star Navy. Adm. Joe Sestak is the highest ranking — and perhaps, least known — veteran who is trying to clinch the Democratic nomination for president in 2020.

Sestak has decades of military experience, but he is not getting nearly as much media attention as fellow veterans Pete Buttigieg and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii). Another veteran, Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.) has dropped out of the race.

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump on Thursday again invited foreign interference in a U.S. presidential election, calling on Ukraine and China to investigate Democratic political rival Joe Biden - similar to a request that has already triggered an impeachment inquiry in Congress.

As he left the White House for a visit to Florida, Trump told reporters he believed Beijing should investigate Biden and his businessman son Hunter Biden.

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(U.S. Army photo)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Last week Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) shared with the country the findings of our two year investigation into foreign trolls who target troops and veterans online, which includes new evidence of foreign-born election interference related to the 2020 presidential campaign.

Macedonians took over and promoted a "Vets for Trump" Facebook page — spreading misinformation about voting along with racist and Islamaphobic propaganda, and engaging in Russian-style election interference, attacking democratic 2020 candidates.

Online entities from Russia, Bulgaria, Ukraine and Vietnam are persistently pretending to be our congressionally chartered veterans service organization — pushing hateful and divisive content alongside VVA-branded material that they're selling on websites which both scrape financial information from troops and veterans, and infect victims' computers with malware.

Trolls from Nigeria have a blossoming criminal empire that involves the identity theft of service members — names and photos of people who serve our country are then used as bait to lure elderly Americans into romance scams, costing some of them their life-savings, which has led several victims to suicide already.

This week, two more disturbing reports were released documenting the increasing dangers of predatory foreign entities online. Oxford University's Computational Propaganda Research Project showed us that at least 70 countries have experienced disinformation campaigns, and that the problem is growing.

Cisco's Talos Intelligence revealed that an imposter website made to look like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's "Hire Our Heroes" was infecting job-seeking troops and veterans' computers with a host of dangerous malware.

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South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg is welcomed Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014, at South Bend International Airport after returning from a seven-month tour of duty with the U.S. Navy in Afghanistan.(Associated Press/South Bend Tribune, Greg Swiercz)

Editor's note: We've been pestering campaign officials since February for an interview with Navy veteran Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and one of the many Democrats running for president in 2020. Finally, after months of silence, the news gods finally delivered.

Below, Buttigieg answers questions from Pentagon correspondent Jeff Schogol on the war in Afghanistan, tensions with Iran, and bridging the civil-military divide.

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Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden (Reuters photo)

A heartbreaking war story former Vice President Joe Biden has told on the campaign trail for years never actually happened, according to a new report in the Washington Post.

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Maj. Ginger Tate speaks to former Vice President Joe Biden during a rally in South Carolina on Aug. 28, 2019. (Twitter/Bo Erickson)

A major with the South Carolina Army National Guard has highlighted military's struggle to remain apolitical in an intensely partisan environment by telling former Vice President Joe Biden that she is praying that he wins the 2020 presidential election.

Maj. Ginger Tate, assigned to the 228th Theater Tactical Signal Brigade headquartered in Spartanburg, South Carolina, attended a nearby Biden rally while wearing her Army uniform on Wednesday, telling Biden that she waited six years to present either him or former President Barack Obama with a challenge coin that she and her first sergeant had possessed since their Afghanistan deployment.

"When I saw on the news last night that you were coming, I just had to be here," Tate said in a video tweeted by CBS News reporter Bo Erickson. "Thank you so much for your guidance as I took 130 soldiers over. I brought them back and I'm so honored to have served under your administration and your leadership, and I hope and pray that you will be our next president of the United States."

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