From left to right: Naval SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher, Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, and Army Special Forces Maj. Matthew Golsteyn (DoD photos)

The U.S. military will not disintegrate into an undisciplined horde following President Donald Trump's recent intervention in three war crimes cases, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark Milley assured lawmakers on Wednesday.

Milley was testifying before the House Armed Services Committee when he was pressed by Iraq war veteran Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.) about the president's actions in the cases of former Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, retired Army Maj. Matthew Golsteyn, and retired Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher.

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A Soldier shakes the hand of a young boy while patrolling to support Operation Inherent Resolve in Mosul, Iraq, July 4, 2017. (U.S. Army/Cpl. Rachel Diehm)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

My cell phone rang on a sweltering Baghdad summer night in 2006. My best friend and West Point classmate, Maj. Bill Taylor was on the other end.

"It's bad," he said. "We need to get these guys to an American military hospital, ASAP."

"These guys" were captured suspected al-Qaeda insurgents, and Bill, one lone American soldier, was now the only thing standing between them and several hundred Iraqi soldiers bent on tearing them apart.

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(Associated Press/Gregory Bull)

SAN DIEGO — President Donald Trump's interventions in a San Diego-based Navy SEAL's war crimes case disrupted the military justice system for months, culminating Sunday in the firing of the Navy secretary as controversy boiled over at the top of military leadership.

The extraordinary interventions by the most powerful man in the country essentially made Navy SEAL Chief Edward Gallagher, who was convicted of posing with the body of a deceased Islamic State fighter, untouchable, observers said.

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President Donald Trump is interviewed by Fox & Friends cohost Pete Hegseth at the White House, April 6, 2017. (Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

President Donald Trump's decision to pardon or reinstate the rank of three warfighters accused or convicted of war crimes went against the advice of his top military officials, relying instead on the advice of outsiders, including Fox News personality Pete Hegseth, The Washington Post reports.

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From left to right: Naval SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher, Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, and Army Special Forces Maj. Matthew Golsteyn (DoD photos)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

President Donald Trump is considering inviting convicted or accused war criminals join him on the 2020 campaign trail, according to a report from The Daily Beast.

The outlet spoke to two sources who said they overheard Trump say he wanted former Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, former Army Special Forces Maj. Mathew Golsteyn, or Navy SEAL Chief Edward Gallagher participate in his rallies.

One source told The Daily Beast: "He briefly discussed making it a big deal at the convention."

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Kenneth Braithwaite (Wikipedia Commons/U.S. Department of State)

President Donald Trump's latest nominee to lead the U.S. Navy has deep Philadelphia ties: Kenneth Braithwaite was a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania, once served as a Ridley Park Councilman and worked at the Philadelphia Naval Base.

Trump announced early Monday that he was nominating Braithwaite, a retired Rear Admiral and the current ambassador to Norway, to replace the ousted Richard Spencer.

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