Army Gen. Mark Milley has been confirmed to become the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

"I am humbled and honored to be confirmed as the next Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff," Milley said Thursday in a statement. "Thank you to the president and the Senate for their confidence. I have been privileged to serve as Chief of Staff of the Army these last four years, and look forward to the opportunity to continue working alongside the soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, Department of Defense civilians, and families serving our nation's military."

Milley is expected to replace the current chairman Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford on Sept. 30.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Army photo

The U.S. Army has not and will not approve enlistment waivers for individuals with a history of self-mutilation or other documented serious mental health conditions, the Army’s top general said Wednesday.

Read More Show Less
Army photos by Sgt. Brandon L. Rizzo

The United States Army is quickly reorganizing to expand its training, advising, and assistance to foreign forces — even as two militaries trained and equipped by the U.S. are clashing with each other in the contested Iraqi city of Kirkuk. The flaring military confrontation between Kurds and Iraqi federal troops highlights the dangers of bolstering the battlefield capabilities of foreign governments whose objectives don’t necessarily align with America’s national interests.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Army photo

The Army has reshaped its primary operating concept to focus on large-scale combat against enemies with technology and capabilities similar to American forces after 16 years of fighting insurgent groups in the Middle East and southwest Asia.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Army photo

North Korea is the single most dangerous threat facing the international community according to the U.S. Army’s top uniformed official and matters are coming to a head. Pyongyang is advancing far more quickly with its nuclear and ballistic missile programs than was expected by the United States. Indeed, the United States is at point where it must make some tough policy choices on how to deal with the North Korean threat.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Army photo

The Army would like more soldiers, but only if Congress provides ample funding to train them properly, the service’s top general said Wednesday, warning that insufficiently prepared troops would lead to a “hollow Army.”

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.