The Russians are not the only game in town when it comes to cyberwarfare, Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said on Thursday amid revelations in the Mueller report about how Russian intelligence officers interfered with the 2016 presidential election.

Released on Thursday, a redacted copy of the report details how the GRU – Russian military intelligence – broke into government, company, and personal computers to steal a treasure trove of information that was used to smear Hillary Clinton.

But the U.S. government is not helpless against Russian hackers, said Shanahan, who has not read the Mueller report.

"The Russians present a risk," Shanahan told reporters on Thursday. "My job is to manage the risk. We have tremendous capability at Cyber Command and the NSA."

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White House/Lawrence Jackson

Law enforcement intercepted two "suspicious packages" sent to the offices of President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Wednesday, the Secret Service announced on Wednesday.

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U.S. Air Force photo / Senior Airman Donald Hudson.

There’s an old saying about opinions. This family-friendly reporter cannot repeat it, but the punchline is, “Everyone has got one.”

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U.S District Court

A former Connecticut sailor is seeking to sue the Department of Justice, former President Barack Obama, former FBI director James Comey, former U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch and FBI agent Peter Strzok, alleging they violated his constitutional right to equal protection under the laws.

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Jake Sullivan, a lawyer and adviser to Hillary Clinton, has written a provocative article, “The World After Trump: How the System Can Survive.” He makes some good points about where the country and the world may be heading but raises several questions. Sullivan has the reputation of a realist and has recently taken the lead of a foreign policy shadow cabinet. His thinking merits close attention.

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U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amber I. Smith

What happens when a White House staffer gets a photo snapped with a yellow sticky note showing the cellphone number of the Secretary of Defense, retired Marine Gen. James Mattis? First, everyone freaks out, understandably. Then, people start calling that phone number — and if you’re an enterprising journalist like Terry Fischer, a sophomore at Mercer Island High School, you manage to turn the administration’s PR blunder into an excellent interview with the military’s top dog.

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