A Democratic lawmaker wants Air Force secretary nominee Barbara Barrett to prohibit airmen from staying at hotels owned by President Donald Trump during mission-related stopovers.

Politico reporters Natasha Bertrand and Bryan Bender first brought to light that Congress investigating why seven airmen stayed at Trump's Turnberry resort in March during a layover in Scotland.

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President Donald Trump has appeared to double down on his claim that the U.S. military's arsenal includes conventional weapons that are more powerful than nukes.

While commemorating the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks Wednesday at the Pentagon, the president warned terrorists that they would be obliterated if they attacked the United States again.

"If, for any reason, they come back to our country, we will go wherever they are and use power the likes of which the United States has never used before," Trump said. "And I'm not even talking about nuclear power. They will have never seen anything like what will happen to them."

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An advisor from the 2nd Security Force Assistance Brigade flies during their deployment to Afghanistan April 12, 2019. (U.S. Army/Sgt. Jordan Trent via Reuters)

BAGRAM AIRFIELD (Reuters) - The U.S. military is likely to accelerate the pace of its operations in Afghanistan to counter an increase in Taliban attacks, a senior U.S. general said on Monday following Washington's suspension of peace talks with the insurgents.

U.S. Marine General Kenneth McKenzie, the head of U.S. Central Command, said during a visit to Afghanistan that the Taliban overplayed its hand in peace negotiations by carrying out a spate of high profile attacks, including one that killed a U.S. soldier last week.

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Smoke rises as angry Kabul residents set fire to part of the Green Village compound that has been attacked frequently, a day after a Taliban suicide attack in Kabul, Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019. (Associated Press/Rahmat Gul)

KABUL/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump's decision to cancel Afghan peace talks will cost more American lives, the Taliban said on Sunday while the United States promised to keep up military pressure on the militants, in a stunning reversal of efforts to forge a deal ending nearly 20 years of war in Afghanistan.

The Islamist group issued a statement after Trump unexpectedly canceled secret talks planned for Sunday with the Taliban's major leaders at the presidential compound in Camp David, Maryland. He broke off the talks on Saturday after the Taliban claimed responsibility for an attack in Kabul last week that killed an American soldier and 11 others.

Zabihullah Mujahid, a Taliban spokesman, criticized Trump for calling off the dialogue and said U.S. forces have been pounding Afghanistan with attacks at the same time.

"This will lead to more losses to the U.S.," he said. "Its credibility will be affected, its anti-peace stance will be exposed to the world, losses to lives and assets will increase."

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

A Homeland Security and counterterrorism advisor appeared to take some of the blame for the confusion wrought by President Donald Trump's presentation of a chart of Hurricane Dorian's path.

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(DoD/Sgt. Amber I. Smith)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Former Defense Secretary and retired four-star Marine Corps general Jim Mattis said he will not be running for president in the 2020 US presidential election and that he was "eager to see the fresh ideas" from the candidates.

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