(Spectrum Bay News 9 image)

Just in time for many high school graduations, Gov. Ron DeSantis has signed into law a measure ensuring that seniors in the military may wear their dress uniforms instead of a cap and gown at their ceremonies.

DeSantis, a former Navy officer, approved SB 292 to become law upon his signature, which came Thursday.

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Sailors man the rails aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) as the ship arrives in Subic Bay, Philippines in support of Exercise Balikatan. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sean Galbreath))

For transgender people in the U.S. military, April is shaping up to be a bittersweet month. But mostly bitter.

Just a few days before the implementation of President Trump's ban on transgender troops, a clarification from the Navy on the dress code of sailors could be perceived as a consolation prize, but it might feel like a slap in the face.

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1st Lt. Marc Tucker, the platoon commander for scout platoon, 1st Tank Battalion, describes the riot-control portion of a situational training exercise conducted by U.S. Marines and Bulgarian soldiers, to James B. Warlick Jr., the U.S. ambassador to Bulgaria, at Novo Selo Training Area, Bulgaria, July 8.

The Marine Corps is looking for input from active duty and reserve Marines on their most burning questions related to uniform policy through an online survey opened Monday, most notably asking whether they can finally use a fucking umbrella when it's raining.

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In another crushing blow to the patriarchy, female sailors have finally received the green light to free their feet from the man-made shackles that are high heels and don flats with their service and dress uniforms.

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A Muslim soldier is preparing to sue the U.S. Army over allegations that her command sergeant major forced her to remove her hijab.

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The five finalists in the Navy Reserve Sailor of the Year competition are pictured on the grounds of the Netherlands Carillon in Washington D.C. (U.S. Navy/Photographer's Mate 1st Class Michael Moriatis)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Navy is rescinding its long-standing tradition requiring sailors to have 12 years of blemish-free conduct to rate gold stripes, officials announced Monday.

Soon, it won't be so easy to spot enlisted sailors who've gotten into some trouble in the past. Starting June 1, sailors with less-than-perfect records will no longer be required to wear red service stripes and rating badges on their uniforms in place of gold.

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