Maj. Matthew Golsteyn in Afghanistan. (Photo courtesy of Philip Stackhouse.)

Nearly a decade after he allegedly murdered an unarmed Afghan civilian during a 2010 deployment, the case of Army Maj. Matthew Golsteyn is finally going to trial.

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(U.S. Navy/Associated Press/Andrew Harnik)

President Donald Trump's nominee for the Navy's top officer wants to identify the "root causes" of the slew of misconduct that's roiled the Naval Special Warfare community in recent years despite a relatively recent Pentagon review that found "no gaps" in the ethics and professional training for U.S. special operations forces.

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Two services. Two incidents involving service members accused of serious misconduct. Two vastly different approaches to openness and transparency.

When U.S. Special Operations Command announced on Wednesday that a SEAL platoon was being sent home early from Iraq because their commander has lost confidence in them, U.S. military officials did not mention that one of the SEALs had been accused of sexually assaulting a female service member. That was first revealed by New York Times reporter David Phillips about 24 hours later.

San Diego-based attorney Jeremiah Sullivan confirmed to Task & Purpose that he represents a member of Foxtrot Platoon SEAL Team 7 who is being investigated for sexually assault but has not been charged.

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Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher dodged the most serious charges the Navy threw at him during his court martial, but his final sentence could be far worse than what the jury originally handed down.

If the convening authority approves the jury's sentence of four months' confinement and a reduction in rank from E7 to E6, Gallagher will be busted down to the rank of E1, according to Navy officials.

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(Associated Press/Gregory Bull)

SAN DIEGO — The Navy SEAL who raised nearly $750,000 from a community of supporters to successfully fight war crimes charges in a San Diego court-martial is again asking for the public's help for one more round with the Navy.

Chief Eddie Gallagher, through an attorney, is asking the public to help him persuade a Navy admiral to reduce his jury-imposed punishment for posing with the body of a dead Islamic State fighter in 2017.

Specifically, he's looking for other service members who have received punishment for taking photos with dead enemy combatants — and received a lesser sentence.

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Navy prosecutors still sifting through the wreckage of their disastrous handling of the SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher case will get another bite at the apple.

Navy SEAL Lt. Jacob "Jake" Portier, Gallagher's former commanding officer, is set to go on trial starting Sept. 3, said Portier's attorney Jeremiah Sullivan.

"You will see many of the same witnesses from the Gallagher trial testify at Lt. Portier's trial," Sullivan told Task & Purpose on Friday. "It will be a second acquittal at great expense to the taxpayers."

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