The sinking of the USS Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941 (U.S. Navy via Assocaited Press)

Ceremonies for Pearl Harbor Day, are already under way on Oahu despite a shooting spree that left three people dead on Wednesday. Officials vow to continue with the traditional Dec. 7 Pearl Harbor commemoration.

Today we take a look at the last three survivors of the USS Arizona, which was sunk on Dec. 7, 1941.

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The USS West Virginia (left) next to the USS Tennessee during the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photo)

The attack on Pearl Harbor happened 78 years ago on Saturday.

The Japanese attack on the U.S. naval base in Hawaii killed more than 2,400 American sailors and civilians and wounded 1,000 more.

Japanese fighter planes also destroyed or damaged almost 20 naval ships and more than 300 planes during the attack.

Several photos were captured during the attack, some of which have become iconic of that infamous day.

Here are the stories behind five of those unforgettable images.

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Photo: Soeren Stache/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Laureen Nussbaum pulled a 76-year-old diary off a bookshelf in her Wallingford apartment. When her German refugee family lived in the Netherlands during the Nazi occupation, they took turns writing in it.

"Finis — Antisemitismus!!" her father wrote as Allied liberators ended the Holocaust. Underneath is the yellow star — branded with the word "jood," Dutch for "Jew" — he no longer had to wear.

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Veterans Day at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, 11 November, 2018. (U.S. Army/Erich Backes)

Crammed inside the small sanctuary of the West Congregational Church in Taunton, more than a hundred community members, first responders and military veterans of all branches stood before the coffin of a local World War II veteran to pay their respects and take the place of his departed family.

"I may not have known Arthur, but the outpouring of support for him here today speaks volumes to his character," Taunton's Acting Mayor Donald Cleary said on Saturday morning.

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Bodies sprawled on the beach of Tarawa atoll after a battle there in late November 1943. (Associated Press photo)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The 18,000 Marines and sailors who landed on the island of Betio in the Tarawa atoll in the Pacific Ocean early on November 20, 1943, waded into what one combat correspondent called "the toughest battle in Marine Corps history."

After 76 hours of fighting, the battle for Betio was over on November 23. More than 1,000 Marines and sailors were killed and nearly 2,300 wounded. Four Marines received the Medal of Honor for their actions — three posthumously.

Of roughly 4,800 Japanese troops defending the island, about 97% were killed. All but 17 of the 146 prisoners captured were Korean laborers.

"Betio would be more habitable if the Marines could leave for a few days and send a million buzzards in," Robert Sherrod, a correspondent for Time, wrote after the fighting.

The victory at Tarawa "knocked down the front door to the Japanese defenses in the Central Pacific," Adm. Chester Nimitz, commander in chief of the Pacific fleet, said afterward.

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SOUTH PORTLAND — Friends, family and local veterans gathered at the Maine Military Museum on Sunday to dedicate a memorial to the late Barry Scott, a Bronze Star recipient who for decades refused to publicize his exploits during World War II.

Members of Rolling Thunder, a motorcycle group dedicated to prisoners of war and those missing in action, helped officiate the ceremony in South Portland.

"Barry was an ordinary man who really did extraordinary things," his brother Milton said, recalling Barry's battlefield courage, his capture by the Germans and the wounds he received in the process.

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