There's nothing like the smell of a long workout poorly masked by the powdery fresh scent of a baby wipe. It's like perfume on a pig. But now, thanks to the innovative efforts of Bravo Sierra and their new approach to hygiene, whether you're in the field or at the gym, you can wash away the smell without needing water.

Thousands of service members understand that when you're downrange, the only option for a shower might be baby wipes. While these do offer some relief, let's be honest: they were never meant to clean the entire body of an adult. Bravo Sierra understood that challenge and developed their own body wipes that are extra-thick, biodegradable and kill 99.9% of bacteria in 60 seconds. Best of all with their refreshing woody scent, they smell like an adult male should, not a baby's ass.

Bravo Sierra recently partnered with Task & Purpose to put on Bootcamp Burnout on December 13th at Chelsea Piers in Manhattan. Participants went through a rigorous fitness circuit to ensure they were nice and sweaty and afterwards, were given Body Wipes. The result? Let's just say they showered Bravo Sierra with praise.

This post was sponsored by Bravo Sierra.

Staff Sgt. Zachary Casey helps unload the plastic crates containing the new Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) equipment onto the USPFO warehouse floor. (U.S. Army/Staff Sgt. Benjamin Crane)

The first Army unit has received the equipment it needs to face the new Army Combat Fitness Test.

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Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

It may take up to five years to finalize the standards for the Army Combat Fitness Test as the service struggles to address the performance gap between male and female soldiers on the service's first-ever gender-neutral fitness assessment.

The Army just completed in late September a year-long field test of the ACFT, involving about 60 battalions of soldiers. And as of Oct. 1, soldiers in Basic Combat Training, advanced Individual training and one station unit training began to take the ACFT as a graduation requirement.

So far, the data is showing "about a 100 to a 110-point difference between men and women, on average," Maj. Gen. Lonnie Hibbard, commander of the Center for Initial Military Training, told Military.com.

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When Maj. Carpaccio "Pace" Owens was into about the seventh year of his Army career, he was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease.

His personal, civilian insurance company has denied him term life insurance based on the preexisting condition.

At 43, Owens is in "stage three" of the disease, meaning his kidneys function at about 50%.

Now 19 years into his Army career, Owens, 43, is one of the first soldiers within the 82nd Airborne Division known to reach an unofficial maximum score on the new Army Combat Fitness Test that goes into effect by October 2020.

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A basic trainee just took the Army's new combat fitness test to school.

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Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy really doesn't want you to know how swole he is, as the former Army ranger refused to answer repeated questions from Task & Purpose about what he scored on the Army Combat Fitness Test.

"I'm not going to tell you," McCarthy said at the Military Reporters and Editors' annual conference in Arlington, Va. on Friday (Oct. 25). McCarthy said he passed the ACFT over a year ago in order to understand the experience.

"I'm a 46-year-old man that rides a desk every day and I got through it," said McCarthy, who described himself as a regular swimmer at the Pentagon pool. "It can be done, you gotta train for it and take care of your body. It's not just working out, it's eating right and sleeping. So I do well on one of those three: working out."

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