In the aftermath of the insider attack that took the life of a U.S. soldier last week, Army officials are reaffirming their concerns over the prevalence of such incidents among U.S. military personnel deployed to Afghanistan to train, advise and assist local security forces, the Associated Press reports.

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U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Jodson B. Graves

Cameroon, the central African country once known as an oasis of stability amongst volatile neighbors, is falling apart. Recent disturbing images emerging depict a country descending into violent civil war as the Cameroonian government fights to quash an Anglophone separatist movement. Thousands of innocent civilians have fled to neighboring Nigeria and Chad to avoid the violent atrocities orchestrated by both sides.

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Reddit/Keggerss

"Bring a knife and some dip."

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U.S. Army/Staff Sgt. Sierra A. Melendez,

Less than a month after announcing the upcoming deployments of thousands of U.S. troops to Afghanistan to relieve existing forces ahead of the spring fighting season, the Army says those soldiers will be accompanied by a fresh batch of combat advisors. The coming deployment marks a historic first: On Jan. 11, the branch announced the deployment of roughly 500 specially trained soldiers with the 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade (SFAB), to provide training and advisory functions for the Afghan National Security and Defense Forces.

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Photo via DoD

CAMP TITIN, JORDAN - "Now move from the 25 yard line to the 15 yard line," shouts one of the U.S. Marines training soldiers from the 77th Royal Jordanian Marine battalion. An observer can't help but wonder if the football imagery gets lost in translation when it is repeated in Arabic as the Jordanians march forward through the dust. At their new tape mark on the desert floor, they raise their M4 assault rifles and rip apart the quiet, plugging scores of live-fire bullets into wooden targets mounted to a wall of tires beneath the Aqaba Mountains.

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Photo via DoD

With criticism mounting over the Trump administration’s handling of the Oct. 4 Niger ambush that left four U.S. service members dead, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joe Dunford laid out the clearest timeline of the attack by ISIS-affiliated militants — and, in the process, hinted that such incidents may become more likely as the campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria winds down.

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