Afghan presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah casts his vote at a polling station in Kabul, Afghanistan September 28, 2019. (Reuters/Omar Sobhani)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Free Liberty.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and the country's chief executive, Abdullah Abdullah, have both claimed victory in a weekend presidential election, a scene reminiscent of the last vote in 2014.

Though preliminary overall results aren't expected for another three weeks, Abdullah told a news conference in Kabul on September 30 that by his count, he won such a clear-cut victory in the balloting that a second-round runoff won't be needed.

That followed a claim by Ghani's running mate, Amrullah Saleh, that the incumbent had won a clear first-ballot victory.

"The information that we have received shows that 60 to 70 percent of people voted [for] us," Saleh was quoted by Voice of America as saying.

Neither side offered any evidence to back up their claims, raising concerns that the war-torn country is headed for a similar situation that arose from the 2014 election, where the same two candidates made competing claims of victory.

Read More
AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini

The U.S military has just a matter of months to figure out its post-2014 presence will look like in Afghanistan. But first, there has to be a victor in the presidential election to replace President Hamid Karzai.

Read More
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.