Associated Press/Charles Dharapak

Editor’s Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.

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Naval History and Heritage Command

Noxious fumes from a 16-year-old decision by federal bureaucrats are finally beginning to dissipate for the Navy’s so-called “Blue Water” vets. They may be on course to again receive benefits for their exposure to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.

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Screenshot from McClatchy DC video

Sam Genco, at age 19, narrowly survived one of the United States’ worst military aircraft carrier fires. Today, 50 years later, it’s that ship’s drinking water he says could be killing him.

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U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Julianne Showalter

National Guard veteran Amie Muller believed deployments to Iraq caused the cancer that killed her.

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AP photo by John Minchillo

For decades, veterans of the Vietnam War have been pushing to get the Department of Veterans Affairs to acknowledge the link between exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange and certain long-term medical conditions, including cancer.

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Georgia Army National Guard photo by Maj. Will Cox

Vietnam veteran Gary Dixon was denied prescription medication by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The reason: they found marijuana in his bloodstream.

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