NATIONAL HARBOR, Maryland — The Air Force is reviewing whether some airmen's valor awards deserve to be upgraded to the Medal of Honor, Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein said on Tuesday.

Goldfein revealed that several airmen are being considered for the nation's highest military award during a press conference at the Air Force Association's annual Air, Space, and Cyber Conference. He declined to say exactly who could receive the Medal of Honor, pending the outcome of the review process.

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Kentucky Air National Guard Special Ops Tech. Sgt. Daniel Keller (U.S. Air Force photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Kentucky Air National Guard Special Ops Tech. Sgt. Daniel Keller doesn't think his brave dash into the open during an ISIS firefight to help dead and wounded comrades is exceptional.

"It's a given; that's what you do," he told Military.com.

Keller is set to receive the nation's second-highest award for valor, the Air Force Cross, on Friday for his heroism in helping to medevac fallen troops during that battle in Afghanistan's Nangarhar province.

"It's a necessary task that has to occur to get your friends the help they need," he said. "Whoever's available, they're going to do it."

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On March 11, 1968, on a remote mountain top in Laos called Lima Site 85, Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Richard Etchberger singlehandedly repelled a North Vietnamese assault and ultimately gave his life to save his teammates.

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U.S. Air Force/Military.com

Editor’s Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.

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Associated Press photo by Henri Huet

Perhaps the most telling thing about “Courage in Combat” lies in the upcoming book’s dedication:

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U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Ryan Conroy

On Sept. 21, 2014, Tech. Sgt. Matthew J. Greiner was engaged in an operation in Helmand, Afghanistan, when his team was ambushed by insurgents. Sustaining serious head injuries from a grenade, Greiner continued to provide air support, protecting his team for nearly 40 minutes and neutralizing the enemy threat.

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