Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

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Flickr/Christopher Michel

Russia's only aircraft carrier, the Admiral Kuznetsov, sustained massive damage from a 70-ton crane falling on it after an accident at a shipyard, Russian media reports.

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Brad Howard/Task & Purpose

What would you do if you had billions of dollars? Two carriers at the same time, man.

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Wikimedia Commons

The Navy used to boast that in a crisis, one of the first questions the president asks is, “Where are the carriers?” Or at least the companies that build and equip the ships did, and still do.

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333 Squadron, Norwegian Royal Airforce/NTB Scanpix

For most sailors who served on the Admiral Kuznetzov, Mazut is the stuff of legends. The ultra thick, tarry black substance that powers the ship is known for being rather toxic, sticky, and not easy to get out of clothes. But why did the Soviet navy keep powering its ships with Mazut? What are the advantages and disadvantages of the fuel? Why exactly is the Kuznetsov so smoky?

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