(U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Robert Alejandre)

Just two years after the Marine Corps dropped $51 million to issue every single grunt a new lightweight combat helmet, the service is eyeing yet another newer, lighter combat helmet.

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Pity the poor tank. As if armored fighting vehicles didn't have enough problems, from missiles and rockets to IEDs lurking in the dirt.

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U.S. Army photo

It looks like the U.S. Army has fully embraced the America’s legions of gamers, but don’t start freaking out about the endtimes just yet. In Operation Overmatch, an upcoming online video game developed by the service, two teams of eight soldiers take command of an assortment of tanks and armored vehicles and do battle with new and advanced war machines.

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Photo via DoD

U.S. Army and Marine Corps troops downrange carry a hell of a lot of stuff. According to a new Government Accountability Office report on the branch efforts to improve personal protective equipment, or PPE, Marines fighting in Iraq or Afghanistan in 2016 humped an average 117-pound load. For the Army, it was 119 pounds, and that figure will likely increase for personnel deployed to Afghanistan in 2017.

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Photo via DoD

An Army Magazine article from 1956 was circulating on Twitter recently, and it predicted what the soldier of the future would look like.

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Photo by Yosoo/Amazon

Anyone who’s served in the military since the Personnel Armor System for Ground Troops was introduced in 1985 knows the value of Kevlar. While the Lightweight Helmet and Advanced Combat Helmet have slowly come to replace the drab olive gear that came to define American troops at the end of the Cold War, the PASGT virtually made Kevlar synonymous with tough, lightweight armor that can take a beating in even the worst situations.

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