Photo via Associted Press

Before his death in 2013, Mikhail Kalashnikov was a Russian lieutenant general and the military engineer behind the legendary AK-47. But as of Sept. 19, Kalashnikov is now a 30-foot bronze statue, brandishing a shiny replica of his ubiquitous assault rifle over the streets of central Moscow.

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Photo via Vitaly V. Kuzmin/Wikimedia Commons

The AK-12 assault rifle has passed military field tests and meets all of the Russian armed forces' design and operational standards, gunmaker Kalashnikov Concern says, according to Jane's 360.

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Photo via DoD

The Department of Defense has a major gun control problem.

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Photo via DoD

The Marine Corps is on the lookout for a few good rifles — with a dozen specific features.

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Photo via Vitaly V. Kuzmin/Wikimedia Commons

Brace yourselves: It looks like Kalashnikov Concern, the weapons manufacturer behind the iconic AK-47, will end up arming the modern Russian warfighter for future conflicts with a brand new addition to its AK family of assault rifles by the end of 2017, Army Recognition reports.

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Screen grab from YouTube

When New York Daily News journalist Gersh Kuntzman penned his recent article about the first time he fired an AR-15 — originally titled “What is like to fire an AR-15? It’s horrifying, dangerous and very very loud” (“dangerous” has since been changed to “menacing”) — he clearly had not anticipated the shit-storm that would surely follow. To write an article so blatantly misleading about an assault rifle that hundreds of thousands of Americans can assemble and dissemble with their eyes closed, and at a time when the national debate over gun control is raging fiercer than ever, is incomprehensibly arrogant. It’s like dry humping a hornets nest and thinking you won’t get stung.

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