HONG KONG (Oct. 2, 2017) Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Sara Farrior, assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Chafee (DDG 90), prepares line to moor the ship in Hong Kong. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Benjamin A. Lewis)

BEIJING (Reuters) - China said on Monday U.S. military ships and aircraft won't be allowed to visit Hong Kong, and also announced sanctions against several U.S. non-government organizations for encouraging protesters to "engage in extremist, violent and criminal acts."

The measures were announced by China's Foreign Ministry in response to U.S. legislation passed last week supporting anti-government protesters. It said it had suspended taking requests for U.S. military visits indefinitely, and warned of further action to come.

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The U.S. issued a stark warning to Beijing on Thursday, as Chinese militarization of the South China Sea creates a potential flashpoint in a longstanding battle for control of the Pacific.

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Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP

My imagined transcript of the exchange in Beijing between Chinese President Xi Jinping and North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un:

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Photo via the Marine Corps History Division Archives

Some things never change, and in the Marine Corps, an institution where upholding tradition is the order of the day, this is doubly true. I’m not talking about eagles, globes, and anchors, immaculate uniforms, or having a high-and-tight, no, I mean the real traditions: the never-ending grunts versus pogs dispute, service rivalries, drunken shenanigans on leave or in the barracks. These staples of the Corps aren’t new, and they’ve provided ample material to enlisted Marines-turned-biting-satirists for nearly a century.

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