Photo via Rock Island Auction

Fellow military history buffs and shooting enthusiasts rejoice, good news is coming your way: An amendment to the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act is set to allow the U.S. Army to, at long last, sell off its surplus Colt M1911A1 pistols.

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U.S. Army

Last week, we got confirmation of a sort that the other three armed services would adopt the Army’s new Modular Handgun System, the M17, to replace the old Beretta M9 service pistol. At least, that’s what Army officials told Military.com in a widely shared story about the MHS program’s progress: The Air Force, they said, was down for 130,000 pistols; the Navy would buy 61,000; and the Marine Corps would take 35,000. Altogether, the three services would take more of the guns than the Army, which was ordering 195,000 M17s.

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SIG Sauer image.

On the Jan. 19, the U.S. Army's six-year-long Modular Handgun System program finally selected a winner, with an announcement that Sig Sauer's P320 will be adopted as the M17. It had been 32 years since the Army last made a major handgun selection. The weapon chosen in 1985 was the pistol the P320 will replace, the Beretta M9.

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U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Austin M. Schlosser

Editor’s Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.

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U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Vanessa Austin

One of the benefits of serving in the military is having the chance to use all kinds of cool equipment like in Hollywood action movies and repetitive Call of Duty games. The Army has its hi-tech Strykers; the Navy has its powerful nuclear engines; the Air Force, its exquisite nine-hole golf courses; and the Coast Guard has, actually I don't know, orange helicopters?

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U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tyler Placie

The gun enthusiast world was set buzzing recently with the news that Naval Special Warfare would be adopting the Glock 19 pistol to replace the SIG Sauer P226. The Glock has recently become prominent within the American special operations community; Rangers, Green Berets, and Air Force special operators have all informally carried variants of it. More officially, Marine Special Operations Command authorized the use of the Glock 19 for annual pistol qualifications. As the end date for solicitation bids on the Army's controversial Modular Handgun System program approaches, the Glock’s spread throughout U.S. Special Operations Command demonstrates the new standard for combat handguns.

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