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The Pentagon moved a total of $35 trillion among its various budget accounts in 2019, Tony Capaccio of Bloomberg first reported.

That does not mean that the Defense Department spent, lost, or could not account for $35 trillion, said Bryan Clark, a senior fellow with the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments think tank in Washington, D.C.

"It means money that DoD moved from one part of the budget to another," Clark explained to Task & Purpose. "So, like in your household budget: It would be like moving money from checking, to savings, to your 401K, to your credit card, and then back."

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Photo: U.S. Army/Kristen Wong

A new study thinks the troops are getting paid a bit too much.

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(Glow Images via Associated Press_

Average pay, housing and subsistence allowances will increase for members of the military in 2020, the Pentagon announced Thursday.

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Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy. (Andrew Harnik/Associated Press)

An internal Army document obtained by Task & Purpose lays out the many ways in which the service could suffer if its sweet, sweet congressional funding doesn't land soon.

Training exercises, field equipment, educational opportunities, facility upgrades and more could all be at risk — severely undercutting the efforts Army leaders have been making to get the service to peak readiness.

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Nothing sends chills down the spines of senior military leaders quite like the words "continuing resolution."

While Congress and the White House continue battling over a seemingly-endless stream of drama, Washington is watching the clock tick down to Nov. 21 when government funding from the current continuing resolution signed in late September runs out.

And for the Army, a continued delay in funding doesn't just throw a wrench in the wheel — it knocks the wheel completely off and sets it on fire.

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Editor's Note: This article by Jim Absher originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Military retirees, those who receive disability or other benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs, federal retirees and social security recipients will see a 1.6% increase in their monthly checks for 2020.

The annual Cost Of Living Allowance (COLA) is smaller than the 2.8% increase from last year but in line with the historical increases seen over the last ten years. Each year military retirement pay, Survivor Benefit Plan Annuities, VA Compensation and Pensions, and Social Security benefits are adjusted for the rate of inflation.

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