A New York Times report published on Thursday outed the anonymous intelligence community whistleblower at the center of a presidential impeachment inquiry as a CIA officer and provided clues to his identity that will likely make it easier for The White House and other observers to identify him.

Three people familiar with the officer's identity told the Times he is a CIA officer who was detailed to work at The White House and has since returned to the CIA. The report added that, based on the newly-released whistleblower complaint, he "was an analyst by training" who was "steeped in details of American foreign policy toward Europe, demonstrating a sophisticated understanding of Ukrainian politics and at least some knowledge of the law."

As the Times notes, CIA officers routinely work in The White House, often working on the National Security Council or managing secure communications with foreign leaders. But this officer didn't work on the communications team, the Times reported.

That level of detail spurred widespread criticism of the Times from lawyers, intelligence professionals, former government officials, journalists, and others.

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(CIA photo)

Before the 5th Special Forces Group's Operational Detachment Alpha 595, before 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment's MH-47E Chinooks, and before the Air Force combat controllers, there were a handful of CIA officers and a buttload of cash.

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An MQ-1 Predator drone fires a Hellfire missile in this undated photo (U.S. Air Force)

In a joint effort to reduce the potential for civilian casualties resulting from U.S. air strikes, the Defense Department and Central Intelligence Agency have reportedly developed a specialized variant of the ubiquitous Hellfire missile that can best be described a 100-pound flying switchblade.

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A woman showed up to the CIA headquarters and demanded to speak with "Agent Penis" earlier this week, and perhaps most shocking of all, she is not from Florida.

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cia

On March 11, 1968, on a remote mountain top in Laos called Lima Site 85, Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Richard Etchberger singlehandedly repelled a North Vietnamese assault and ultimately gave his life to save his teammates.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

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