A father comforts his child with an American flag before a naturalization ceremony. (U.S. Marine Corps/Pfc. Nicole Rogge)

Since the confusing rollout of a policy affecting the path to citizenship for some children of U.S. service members and government employees, officials have since attempted to clarify that the change will only effect a small number of people a year.

In the text of the policy update released on Wednesday, U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS) said that the policy impacted "children residing abroad with their U.S. citizen parents who are U.S. government employees or members of the U.S. armed forces."

But that's not quite the case, as USCIS officials later clarified: it affects only children who were not U.S. citizens at birth, which means children adopted overseas, and children born to non-U.S. citizen parents.

Let's break this down.

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A Soldier holds an American flag prior to the start of an oath of citizenship ceremony in the General George Patton Museum's Abrams Auditorium at Fort Knox, Kentucky, Sept. 19, 2018. (U.S. Army/ Eric Pilgrim)

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Following the disastrous rollout of a policy this week that delineates U.S. residency requirements for the purpose of U.S. citizenship as it applies to children born abroad, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services on Thursday sought to clarify the changes, saying in a conference call with reporters that its data indicate the measure would have affected only "20 to 25 children a year."

The policy, issued Wednesday, spells out what the department deems residency in terms of U.S. citizenship considerations of offspring born overseas.

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President Donald Trump. Photo: Air Force Tech. Sgt. Vernon Young.

Some children born to U.S. service members and government employees overseas will no longer be automatically considered citizens of the United States, according to policy alert issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on Wednesday.

Previously, all children born to U.S. citizen parents were considered to be "residing in the United States," and therefore would be automatically granted citizenship under Immigration and Nationality Act 320. Now, children born to U.S. service members and government employees who are not yet themselves U.S. citizens, while abroad, will not be considered as residing in the U.S., changing the way that they potentially receive citizenship. Children who are not U.S. citizens and are adopted by U.S. service members while living abroad will also no longer receive automatic citizenship by living with the U.S. citizen adopted parents.

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Photo: Al Diaz/Miami Herald via AP

The man who called himself Eagle labored over his answers.

Becoming an American citizen requires a lot of questions. There's the basic: employment, spouse, family. Then there are the ones that get down to the nitty gritty.

Have you ever been a member of or associated with a terrorist organization? Were you ever involved with genocide? Were you ever a member of, serve in, help or participate in a military unit?

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Marco Antonio De la Garza (U.S. District Court - Tucson)

A former customs officer in Douglas was sentenced last week to one year of probation and fined $1,000 for lying about being a U.S. citizen.

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Associated Press/Eric Gay

Yea Ji Sea joined the U.S. Army more than four years ago hoping to serve her new country and, in the process, earn her citizenship.

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