There are few sights more exciting than a futuristic fighter jet tearing across a clear blue sky. In video games, movies, and comic books, these slices of imagination dominate the skies and look good doing it. And whether or not they’re hitting Mach 3 during an attack run against invading aliens or attempting to topple some genocidal giant robots, it's nice to know that the Pentagon can always just turn to Netflix for inspiration when it starts dreaming up the warplanes of the future.

Read More Show Less
Screengrab via YouTube

Not long after Medal of Honor recipient Audie Murphy returned home from World War II in 1945, he marched into Hollywood and began his career as an actor. Over the next 20 years, Murphy — already renowned as one of the most (some would say the most) decorated soldiers of WWII — appeared in more than 40 feature films, including the 1955 blockbuster To Hell and Back, a movie based on his autobiography. Naturally, Murphy played himself.

Read More Show Less
Image via YouTube

An award-winning filmmaker is developing what he describes as an “anti-war” response to American Sniper, Clint Eastwood’s 2014 blockbuster film about real-life Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle’s legendary exploits, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Read More Show Less
DoD photo by Army Staff Sgt. Sean K. Harp

The three California men who famously thwarted a terror attack on a Paris-bound train in 2015 will play themselves in an upcoming film directed by Clint Eastwood about the incident, the Associated Press reports.

Read More Show Less
Warner Bros. Pictures.

Dec. 5, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the Clint Eastwood classic, “Heartbreak Ridge.” Some of you millennial types may not have heard of it, much to your disadvantage, though perhaps the saltier ones among you are shouting “Ooh-Freakin’-Rah!” right now. “Heartbreak Ridge” might not be the entire reason I joined the Marine Corps, but it was probably the reason I was so excited to do it.

Read More Show Less
Screen grab from YouTube

In the final scene of Sergio Leone’s critically acclaimed spaghetti western, “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly,” Clint Eastwood’s character, Blondie, “The Good,” saves Tuco, “The Ugly,” from the hangman’s noose by severing the rope with a single rifle shot. A similar scene played out in real life last week, when an Army veteran used his sharp-shooting skills to free a bald eagle from certain death.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.