Veterans groups are hailing a move by the House of Representatives that would require President Donald Trump to get Congress' permission before attacking Iran.

In a 251-170 vote, the House passed an amendment to the Fiscal 2020 National Defense Authorization Act that would stop Trump from using federal funding for military operations against Iran without a declaration from war or a new authorization for military force from Congress.

"After almost two decades of fighting with no end in sight, Americans are tired of never-ending wars," Nate Anderson, executive director of Concerned Veterans for America, said in a statement. "This amendment begins to reassert Congress's constitutional role in matters of war and peace."

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(Associated Press photo)

A small group of lawmakers is arguing that President Donald Trump does not have the power to launch a new war against Iran without first getting permission from Congress.

Chief among them is Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.), who was one of six lawmakers who voiced their support on Wednesday for a proposed amendment to the fiscal 2020 National Defense Authorization Act that would prevent any federal money from funding a war with Iran unless Congress declared war or Trump secured a new authorization for the use of military force.

Only after Congress has had a "thorough debate of the facts, the findings, and the intelligence presented to us" should lawmakers decide whether the United States should go to war with Iran, said Moulton, a Marine veteran who deployed to Iraq four times.

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On Tuesday, two political veterans groups, one on the left, the other on the right, announced a new lobbying campaign aimed at ending America's 'forever wars.'

In a video tied to the announcement, Dan Caldwell, the senior adviser to Concerned Veterans for America, a conservative veterans' group, and Jon Soltz, the chairman of VoteVets, a liberal vets group which aims to get former service members into office, laid out their plan for a lobbying campaign aimed at changing policy on how the United States wages war.

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Dan Caldwell, the executive director of Concerned Veterans for America, and Jon Soltz, the chairman for VoteVets on MSNBC's Morning Joe on March 18 discussing their campaign to see Congress end America's Forever Wars. (MSNBC/Youtube)

Two political veterans groups, one conservative, the other liberal, have spent millions fighting each other on various fronts, from Department of Veterans Affairs reform — what one group calls "choice" and the other calls "privatization" — to getting their pick of candidates into office.

But they've found common ground on at least one issue: It's time for Congress to have an open debate about ending the Forever Wars.

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Getty Images/Alex Wong

The Department of Veterans Affairs has never enjoyed a reputation for doing its job well, no matter who was in charge — doctor, CEO, or soldier, Democrat or Republican.

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Getty Images/Aaron P. Bernstein

Leading veterans service organizations met Tuesday to mount a joint response in the face of a troubling inspector general report alleging “serious derelictions” in expensing on the part of the Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin and his top staff during a Europe trip last July, multiple sources told Task & Purpose.

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