An artist's depiction of the High Energy Laser and Integrated Optical-dazzler with Surveillance (HELIOS) in action. (Courtesy of Lockheed Martin)

The Navy is scared to death that rival countries like China, Russia and Iran might sink its multibillion dollar surface ships with powerful cruise missiles and waves of cheap drones. But while ship-mounted lasers could be the Navy's most effective response to these threats, a new Congressional Research Service report on directed energy weapons indicates many of the Navy's newest destroyers might not have enough power to fire them.

The Navy "will have to either remove something or look at 'very aggressive power management,'" in order to install one 60 kilowatt laser system, called the high-energy laser with integrated optical dassler and surveillance (HELIOS), onto the newest flight of Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, the report said, citing Rear Adm. Ron Boxall, director of Navy Surface Warfare, who was quoted in several news articles.

"[W]e are out of Schlitz with regard to power," Boxall said, noting that the Flight III Arleigh Burke destroyers are already strapped powering the new AN/SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar. "'We used a lot of power for that and we don't have as much' extra for additional functions."

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MOSCOW (Reuters)- A Russian nuclear submarine aborted the test firing of an intercontinental ballistic missile during a military exercise overseen by President Vladimir Putin last week, the Ministry of Defence said on Monday.

The nuclear submarine, K-44 Ryazan, part of Russia's Pacific Fleet, was meant to launch two R-29R ballistic missiles from the Sea of Okhotsk on Oct. 17, but fired only one successfully with the other remaining in its tube onboard the submarine, the Vedomosti daily reported earlier on Monday.

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MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia announced on Monday it would hold a large test of its Strategic Missile Forces that will see it fire ballistic and cruise missiles from the land, sea and air this week.

The exercise, from Oct. 15-17, will involve around 12,000 military personnel, as well as aircraft, including strategic nuclear bombers, surface ships and submarines, Russia's Ministry of Defense said in a statement.

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Responding to a distress call, sailors assigned to a rescue and assistance team from the U.S. Navy guided-missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG 68), provide aid to the motor vessel SINAA, a 35-meter Iranian-flagged dhow. Anzio supplied the dhow with water, fuel and food to sustain her crew of 24 for their transit home on Nov. 10, 2006. The Pentagon is working with its Defense Intelligence Agency to declassify and release images, including two Iranian dhows carrying land-attack missiles, to back up the Trump administration's claims of a growing threat from Iran, according to four defense officials. (U.S. Navy/Ensign Patrick King)

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon is working with its Defense Intelligence Agency to declassify and release images — including two traditional sailing vessels carrying land-attack missiles — to back up the Trump administration's claims of a growing threat from Iran, according to four defense officials.

The evidence may be released within a day, according to one of the officials, because the White House recognizes it needs to disclose more documentation to skeptical allies, U.S. lawmakers and the public.

These include images of the two dhows, slow-moving vessels that U.S. analysts believe were carrying cruise missiles that are designed to attack land targets and would be fired directly from the boats rather than shipped to other locations, according to one of the defense officials.

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A launching unit for BGM-109G Gryphon missiles. (U.S. Air Force/Tech Sgt. Rob Marshall)

The Pentagon reportedly plans to restart the manufacturing process for once-banned ground-launched cruise missiles as a Cold War-era arms agreement with Russia crumbles, Aviation Week reports.

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The U.S. ambassador to NATO, Kay Bailey Hutchison, says that the United States could “take out” Moscow’s intermediate range missiles that are being developed in contravention of the bilateral U.S-Russia Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty. Hutchison insists that the United States will adhere to the INF, but that Russia must stop its violation of the treaty.

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