U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Josh Cote.

Leave the “service economy” stuff to other people. You were in the military. You do things, and now that you’ve transitioned, you want to make things. Maybe you swung a wrench, or maybe you designed systems; any way you slice it, you did. Join these great companies that manufacture stuff — that make; that do.

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Casperassets.rbl.ms

Benjamin Franklin nailed it when he said, "Fatigue is the best pillow." True story, Benny. There's nothing like pushing your body so far past exhaustion that you'd willingly, even longingly, take a nap on a concrete slab.

Take $75 off a Casper Mattress and $150 off a Wave Mattress with code TASKANDPURPOSE

And no one knows that better than military service members and we have the pictures to prove it.

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U.S. Air Force photo

Like any ship, building, ground vehicle or aircraft, corporate America needs individuals schooled in the art and science of maintenance. Companies of all shapes and sizes, in a variety of sectors, depend on complicated machinery, electrical and nuclear equipment, housed within expansive facilities to reach their business objectives. When these pieces of equipment or facilities fail, skilled professionals are needed to fix them. These 10 Hirepurpose partners are military-friendly companies with openings across the country — and are well-suited for veterans who underwent electrical, mechanical, or facilities maintenance training while in the service.

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U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman M. M. Gillan

Companies of all kinds depend on complicated machinery, electrical and nuclear equipment, housed within expansive facilities to reach their business objectives. When these pieces of equipment or facilities fail, skilled professionals are needed to fix them.

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Navy photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer Joe Kane

Transitioning from the military is no small task and many decisions need to be made during the process. A few of the most important questions to ponder are: “Will I continue in the field I am in?” or “Am I ready to take on a new challenge?” Whether you served four years or 30, leaving the military may be just the right time to take on a whole new adventure in a completely different field, or use your experience to work your way up in the same field but new company.

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