Federal prosecutors Thursday charged a Long Island company, its chief executive and other employees with fraudulently passing off Chinese-made surveillance and security equipment as American-made and selling it to the U.S. government — potentially exposing the military and federal agencies to cybersecurity surveillance and attack.

Commack-based Aventura Technologies Inc., and seven of its current and former employees, ran the scheme that dated to 2006, netting some $88 million in sales, including $20 million in government contracts in the last nine years, authorities said.

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Remote Combat Effects Campaign Medal (U.S. Air Force graphic by Staff Sgt. Sahara Fales)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The U.S. Air Force says airmen serving in cyber; space; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and remotely piloted aircraft jobs may be eligible to receive the newly created Remote Combat Effects Campaign Medal if they were part of operations that had significant impact.

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Clouds roll over the White House, Tuesday Jan. 8, 2019, in Washington. (Associated Press/Jacquelyn Martin)

An internal White House memo has warned that it could be hacked again because so many cybersecurity officials have resigned or been pushed out under President Donald Trump's administration, Axios reports.

"I foresee the White House is posturing itself to be electronically compromised once again," wrote Dimitrios Vastakis, a branch chief of the White House computer network defense unit, in the October 17 memo obtained by Axios.

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(U.S. Air Force/Master Sgt. Barry Loo)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A team of former U.S. government intelligence operatives working for the United Arab Emirates hacked into the iPhones of activists, diplomats and rival foreign leaders with the help of a sophisticated spying tool called Karma, in a campaign that shows how potent cyber-weapons are proliferating beyond the world's superpowers and into the hands of smaller nations.

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Wikimedia Commons

The Japanese minister tasked with maintaining the government's cybersecurity capabilities has reportedly never used a computer before in his adult life, the Associated Press reports with a straight face.

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Flickr/Blogtrepreneur

Defense Secretary James Mattis announced last month that his department would be standing up a new task force to make recommendations about securing the defense industrial base from cyber attack. This comes after a Chinese company was charged with attempting to steal trade secrets from a leading U.S. chip manufacturer.

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