In less than three years after the National Security Agency found itself subject to an unprecedentedly catastrophic hacking episode, one of the agency's most powerful cyber weapons is reportedly being turned against American cities with alarming frequency by the very foreign hackers it was once intended to counter.

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(Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency photo)

Only a few have gone through the extensive background checks needed to access Plum Island, where a secretive branch of the U.S. government runs exercises to prepare for all-out cyber war.

The speck of land in the Long Island Sound, owned by the Department of Homeland Security, is largely deserted. The main attractions are a defunct lighthouse and a center that studies infectious animal diseases.

It is also the perfect setting for the U.S. government to stage mock cyber attacks on the power grid.

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An entrance sign at Fort Bragg (Wikimedia Commons)

Fort Bragg officials issued an apology late Thursday, after realizing shutting off power to tens of thousands of post residents created alarm on the post and generated some rather bizarre conspiracy theories in the surrounding community.

This includes suggestions it was a terrorist attack... or a secret Army experiment that shorted out the power grid for miles.

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Voters fill out their ballots for the midterm election at a polling place in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S. November 6, 2018. (Reuters/Nick Oxford)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. military disrupted the internet access of a Russian troll farm accused of trying to influence American voters on Nov. 6, 2018, the day of the congressional elections, The Washington Post reported on Tuesday.

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The Army may have festooned its Stryker fighting vehicles with a slew of new armaments as part of the Pentagon's relentless pursuit of lethality, but the upgunned infantry carriers are apparently hobbled by a major deficiency that makes them especially vulnerable in a fight against Russia or China.

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The names and addresses of nearly 1,000 North Koreans who defected and resettled in South Korea were stolen during a recent security breach, according to the AP.

South Korea's Unification Ministry said the names, home addresses, and birthdays of 997 defectors were stolen sometime in November. The source of the breach hasn't been determined, but the most obvious suspect would be North Korea.

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