Gross. (U.S. Army/Spc. Scott Lindblom)

WASHINGTON — The price tag to clean up contaminated water sources at all military installations is likely to climb higher than the $2 billion original cost estimate, the Pentagon said Thursday.

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DoD/Lisa Ferdinando

Military base schools and Hurricane Maria-related recovery projects in Puerto Rico are among the military construction projects having their funding redirected to pay for the border wall.

A list provided by the Department of Defense on Tuesday offered an itemized look at the $3.6 billion worth of military construction projects that are having their funding reprogrammed towards the wall at the southwest border, which came about after President Donald Trump declared a national emergency earlier this year.

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Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Pentagon on Thursday officially established United States Space Command, a precursor to the Space Force military service President Donald Trump has called for.

As the nation's 11th geographic combatant command, Space Command was created to defend U.S. space-enabled capabilities in this new warfighting domain, said Air Force Gen. John "Jay" Raymond, who assumed command of U.S. Space Command on Thursday.

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A U.S. Marine with Task Force Southwest observes Afghan National Army (ANA) 215th Corps soldiers move to the rally point to begin their training during a live-fire range at Camp Shorabak. (U.S. Marine Corps/Sgt. Luke Hoogendam)

By law, the United States is required to promote "human rights and fundamental freedoms" when it trains foreign militaries. So it makes sense that if the U.S. government is going to spend billions on foreign security assistance every year, it should probably systematically track whether that human rights training is actually having an impact or not, right?

Apparently not. According to a new audit from the Government Accountability Office, both the Departments of Defense and State "have not assessed the effectiveness of human rights training for foreign security forces" — and while the Pentagon agreed to establish a process to do so, State simply can't be bothered.

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Ed Mahoney/Kickstarter

In June 2011 Iraq's defense minister announced that U.S. troops who had deployed to the country would receive the Iraq Commitment Medal in recognition of their service. Eight years later, millions of qualified veterans have yet to receive it.

The reason: The Iraqi government has so far failed to provide the medals to the Department of Defense for approval and distribution.

A small group of veterans hopes to change that.

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(U.S. Air Force/Master Sgt. Barry Loo)

WASHINGTON — Defense Department employees have procured thousands of printers, cameras and computers that carry known cybersecurity risks, and the practice may be continuing, according to an audit released Tuesday by the Pentagon's inspector general.

More than 9,000 commercially available information technology products bought in fiscal 2018 could be used to spy on or hack U.S. military personnel and facilities, the report said. Without fixing oversight of such purchases, more risks lie ahead, potentially including perils for top-dollar weapons that use such "commercial-off-the-shelf" or COTS devices.

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