Two federal law enforcement agencies are investigating whether a former enlisted Marine pretended to be an officer to help an active duty infantryman smuggle arms into Haiti, according to court filings viewed by Task & Purpose.

Marine Sgt. Jacques Yves Sebastien Duroseau was detained by local police in Haiti after he landed at the international airport in Port-au-Prince on Nov. 12 with three plastic boxes containing guns, ammo, body armor, and a plan to train members of the Haitian military, the filings claim.

A federal criminal complaint filed on Nov. 27 in the Eastern District of North Carolina alleges that Duroseau was aided by a "known individual" who purchased his plane ticket, and helped him bring the weapons to the Coastal Carolina Regional Airport in New Bern, North Carolina for his flight on Nov. 11. That individual, according to a Nov. 22 affidavit in support of a search warrant of Duroseau's residence, is Taylor Hickey, a former Marine who lived with Duroseau in Jacksonville, North Carolina.

Hickey declined to comment when reached by Task & Purpose. Duroseau's attorney did not respond to a request for comment.

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A father comforts his child with an American flag before a naturalization ceremony. (U.S. Marine Corps/Pfc. Nicole Rogge)

Since the confusing rollout of a policy affecting the path to citizenship for some children of U.S. service members and government employees, officials have since attempted to clarify that the change will only effect a small number of people a year.

In the text of the policy update released on Wednesday, U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS) said that the policy impacted "children residing abroad with their U.S. citizen parents who are U.S. government employees or members of the U.S. armed forces."

But that's not quite the case, as USCIS officials later clarified: it affects only children who were not U.S. citizens at birth, which means children adopted overseas, and children born to non-U.S. citizen parents.

Let's break this down.

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President Donald Trump. Photo: Air Force Tech. Sgt. Vernon Young.

Some children born to U.S. service members and government employees overseas will no longer be automatically considered citizens of the United States, according to policy alert issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on Wednesday.

Previously, all children born to U.S. citizen parents were considered to be "residing in the United States," and therefore would be automatically granted citizenship under Immigration and Nationality Act 320. Now, children born to U.S. service members and government employees who are not yet themselves U.S. citizens, while abroad, will not be considered as residing in the U.S., changing the way that they potentially receive citizenship. Children who are not U.S. citizens and are adopted by U.S. service members while living abroad will also no longer receive automatic citizenship by living with the U.S. citizen adopted parents.

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New York National Guard Soldiers and Airmen of the 24th Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support Team (CST) and 106th Rescue Wing prepare to identify and classify several hazardous chemical and biological materials during a collective training event at the Plum Island Animal Disease Research Facility, New York, May 2, 2018. (U.S. Army/Sgt. Harley Jelis)

The Department of Homeland Security stored sensitive data from the nation's bioterrorism defense program on an insecure website where it was vulnerable to attacks by hackers for over a decade, according to government documents reviewed by The Los Angeles Times.

The data included the locations of at least some BioWatch air samplers, which are installed at subway stations and other public locations in more than 30 U.S. cities and are designed to detect anthrax or other airborne biological weapons, Homeland Security officials confirmed. It also included the results of tests for possible pathogens, a list of biological agents that could be detected and response plans that would be put in place in the event of an attack.

The information — housed on a dot-org website run by a private contractor — has been moved behind a secure federal government firewall, and the website was shut down in May. But Homeland Security officials acknowledge they do not know whether hackers ever gained access to the data.

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(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Keion Jackson).

The U.S. military will build 'facilities' to house at least 7,500 adult migrants, the Pentagon announced on Wednesday.

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has approved a request from the Department of Homeland Security to construct the facilities, said Pentagon spokesman Army Maj. Chris Mitchell.

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President Donald Trump tweeted on Wednesday that the Pentagon is "now sending ARMED SOLDIERS to the Border," an escalation on his declaration in early April that he's "going to have to call up more military" to defend U.S.-Mexico border.

But when the commander-in-chief imagined a fresh round of troop deployment to the southwest border, he probably didn't mean military cooks, lawyers, and drivers.

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