President Donald Trump. Photo: Air Force Tech. Sgt. Vernon Young.

Some children born to U.S. service members and government employees overseas will no longer be automatically considered citizens of the United States, according to policy alert issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on Wednesday.

Previously, all children born to U.S. citizen parents were considered to be "residing in the United States," and therefore would be automatically granted citizenship under Immigration and Nationality Act 320. Now, children born to U.S. service members and government employees who are not yet themselves U.S. citizens, while abroad, will not be considered as residing in the U.S., changing the way that they potentially receive citizenship. Children who are not U.S. citizens and are adopted by U.S. service members while living abroad will also no longer receive automatic citizenship by living with the U.S. citizen adopted parents.

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In the military there’s a long-running joke about why people marry junior service members, and it almost always revolves around the benefits, mainly Tricare.

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U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Thomas Mudd.

Legislation introduced Thursday would make it easier for military spouses to purchase guns wherever their active-duty husband or wife is permanently stationed.

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Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric Garst

As a military brat, you often are born into a world where you move constantly, experience long parental absences, and are forced to grow up a little faster than most kids.

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