Jilmar Ramos-Gomez was a lance corporal in the Marines and received awards for service in Afghanistan. (Michigan ACLU)

The city of Grand Rapids, Michigan will pay $190,000 to a Marine veteran who was arrested by police and wrongfully turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials.

The Grand Rapids City Commission approved the settlement Tuesday for Jilmar Ramos-Gomez, 28, who was born and raised in Michigan.

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The plight of non-citizen U.S. military veterans who face deportation was discussed Tuesday during a Congressional hearing that examined the impact of immigration policies on active service members, veterans and their families.

The hearing came a week after the deportation of Jose Segovia Benitez, a long-time Long Beach resident and former Marine who fought for the U.S. in Iraq before running afoul of the law.

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U.S. Marine combat veteran Jose Segovia Benitez was deported Tuesday night to El Salvador to the surprise of his lawyers who were told they had more time to fight for him.

"They snuck him out in the middle of the night," said Texas attorney Tom Sanchez, who recently joined efforts to help keep the Long Beach resident from being deported.

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An Army veteran who was deported last year is back in Chicago this week to fight for citizenship, hoping to stay in the country he's called home since he was a child.

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Top officials of the Department of Veterans Affairs declined to step in to try to exempt veterans and their families from a new immigration rule that would make it far easier to deny green cards to low-income immigrants, according to documents obtained by ProPublica under a Freedom of Information Act request.

The Department of Defense, on the other hand, worked throughout 2018 to minimize the new policy's impact on military families.

As a result, the regulation, which goes into effect in October, applies just as strictly to veterans and their families as it does to the broader public, while active-duty members of the military and reserve forces face a relaxed version of the rule.

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(Courtesy of Roman Sabal)

A deported Marine Corps veteran who has been unable to come back to the U.S. for more than a decade was denied entry to the country Monday morning when he asked to be let in for a scheduled citizenship interview.

Roman Sabal, 58, originally from Belize, came to the San Ysidro Port of Entry around 7:30 on Monday morning with an attorney to ask for "parole" to attend his naturalization interview scheduled for a little before noon in downtown San Diego. Border officials have the authority to temporarily allow people into the country on parole for "humanitarian or significant public benefit" reasons.

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