Jackie Huber in 1984. (U.S. Marine Corps photo0

Jackie Huber was one of the few, but she never felt particularly proud as a woman Marine.

She spent 20 years in the Marine Corps, from 1984 to 2004, and rose from the enlisted ranks to chief warrant officer. She worked in MISSO, the Manpower Information System Support Office, entering data about service members at installations on the East and West coasts. She volunteered for the same duty in Somalia as part of Operation Restore Hope and lived in a sand-filled camp that smelled of dirt and death.

Huber said it wasn't cool to be a Marine during most of her tenure, which was before the days military members were thanked for their service. Some of the men she worked with made it clear they looked upon women as more trouble than they were worth—unless they needed someone to sleep with, Huber said.

"We were treated like second-class citizens, and we had few rights and fewer advocates," Huber said. "That's why I didn't want anyone to know what I had done. I didn't wanted to be treated like that anymore."

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U.S. Army photo / Elizabeth Fraser.

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Task & Purpose photo illustration/U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Dusty Kilcrease

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