President Donald Trump. Photo: Air Force Tech. Sgt. Vernon Young.

Some children born to U.S. service members and government employees overseas will no longer be automatically considered citizens of the United States, according to policy alert issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on Wednesday.

Previously, all children born to U.S. citizen parents were considered to be "residing in the United States," and therefore would be automatically granted citizenship under Immigration and Nationality Act 320. Now, children born to U.S. service members and government employees who are not yet themselves U.S. citizens, while abroad, will not be considered as residing in the U.S., changing the way that they potentially receive citizenship. Children who are not U.S. citizens and are adopted by U.S. service members while living abroad will also no longer receive automatic citizenship by living with the U.S. citizen adopted parents.

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Less than two months after President Donald Trump declared a national emergency at the southern border, the Department of Homeland Security is witnessing "a purge of the nation's immigration and security leadership," as The New York Times put it.

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Secretary Nielsen. Photo: U.S. Customs and Border Protection Office of Public Affairs

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is resigning, effective immediately.

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Mani Albrecht/

Someone over at the Department of Homeland Security is using a terribly-programmed bot to write their press releases or they just can't write proper English.

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DHS photo by Barry Bahler

Secretary of Homeland Security John F. Kelly got real candid during a public speech in which he described the international and domestic threats facing the United States. He also went on the offensive, going after politicians who have criticized the actions of DHS.

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Task & Purpose illustration by Matt Battaglia

David is sore most days. It’s his back and his hands, mostly, but to be honest, it’s all the joints. He’s deaf in one ear, blind in one eye, and walks with a cane. He’s 64 and has arthritis most everywhere you can have it. But there’s some pain that age doesn’t inflict. Terrible thoughts, the stuff of bad dreams. For him they’re memories, and all too real.

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