The tale of Marine aviators who flew a phallic pattern over California has what can best be described in massage parlor terminology as a “happy ending": the two aviators will keep their wings and remain “valued members” of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing after being disciplined administratively, a Marine Corps spokesman told Task & Purpose.

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Photo courtesy of the unofficial Air Force amn/nco/snco Facebook page.

Do not look for the sky penis. That is impossible. Instead, only try to realize the truth: There is no sky penis.

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In the latest frightening example of cockpit problems in high-performance military aircraft, the Navy is investigating a recent incident in which the cockpit temperature of an EA-18G Growler reportedly plunged to minus 30 degrees Fahrenheit. Ice coated flight instruments and windows, forcing the plane’s two-person crew to land using a Garmin watch and spoken instructions from air controllers.

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U.S. Navy file photo

Fighter and attack squadrons on two U.S. aircraft carriers — one engaged in operations against ISIS, the other on station in the restive West Pacific — have resorted to extraordinary measures to keep their pilots safe from persistent oxygen-supply problems in the Navy’s go-to carrier aircraft, the F-18 Hornet.

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U.S. Marine Corps photo by Capt. Christopher Prout

Editor's Note: This article by Hope Hodge Seck originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.

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