DoD photo

The Department of Defense Thursday afternoon unveiled new changes to the Forever GI Bill, requiring service members to meet stricter requirements if they wish to transfer education benefits to a dependent — including a cap on how long you can wait to pass on those bennies. Previously, “There were no restrictions on when a service member could transfer educational benefits,” Pentagon spokeswoman Jessica R. Maxwell told T&P; in an email.

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Benjamin Franklin nailed it when he said, "Fatigue is the best pillow." True story, Benny. There's nothing like pushing your body so far past exhaustion that you'd willingly, even longingly, take a nap on a concrete slab.

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And no one knows that better than military service members and we have the pictures to prove it.

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Department of Defense photo

In 2012, Sgt. Desmond Watson’s daughter Jordan Bigbee turned 17, and he transferred his Post-9/11 GI Bill to her in the hopes that she’d never have to shoulder a student debt burden.

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U.S. Army photo

No more “Post-9/11,” no more “Montgomery” (for those who remember it, anyway): A bipartisan slate of senators and congressmen, assisted by major veterans service organizations and other vets advocacy groups, is set to unveil its plan for a “forever” GI Bill today. And in a topsy-turvy year where very little is happening in Congress policy-wise, a broad, permanent bill of rights for student veterans and their families has a pretty good chance of sailing through the government.

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U.S. Army photo by Nell King.

Nearly 300 Marines came home from their seven-month deployment to Central America this week. They have a few things in tow — wood carvings from local artisans and the grit of experience responding to Hurricane Matthew, among the world’s worst recent natural disasters.

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Photo by the U.S. Army

According to Forbes Magazine, “most veterans are more qualified than they realize for well-paying jobs.” They usually have the practical experience in leading people, managing complex problems, and navigating large logistical operations. However, many times they don’t have the degree behind their work experience. G.I. Jobs asked 184 military-friendly employers --- meaning they actively recruit and retain veteran employees --- what their top careers are for vets. Engineering, nursing, business administrator and financial services professional are among the top jobs. Most of these jobs, however, require at least a four-year degree.

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